Local News

Rejected federal grants come back to Assembly

Ketchikan Gateway Borough officials have repackaged some grants that the Borough Assembly rejected about two weeks ago, so the Assembly on Monday can take another look at them and the projects they would fund.

On Oct. 15th, the Assembly voted 3-2 in favor of a resolution appropriating grant money. However, a motion requires at least four yes votes to pass, so the resolution failed. Two Assembly members were absent from that meeting.

Borough Manager Dan Bockhorst told the Assembly that he likely would bring the items back with additional arguments in favor of appropriating the funds.

The federal grant funds in question were intended for the borough’s transit department. Most did not require a local match. Some of the items on the list were additional bus shelters, a restroom at Thomas Basin and a replacement support vehicle.

For Monday’s repackaged agenda item, Bockhorst reminds the Assembly that the borough already accepted the federal grant money for the projects. The motion merely will appropriate the funds.

Grants to help pay for an airport ferry deckhand position and to pay off $1.2 million in airport revenue bonds also are part of the agenda item.

A related motion on Monday’s agenda is a state grant for the transit department. If the Assembly accepts the approximately $160,000 grant, the funds would be used to help the borough match other grants for transit projects.

The Assembly meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. Monday in Borough Assembly chambers at the White Cliff building. Public comment will be heard at the start of the meeting.

 

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