Local News

Square dance helps ward off the winter blues

During the dark months of the year, there are numerous activities in Ketchikan to help residents ward off the winter blues. Square dancing has become a regular and popular event for locals.

Each month throughout the year, a bunch of square-minded folk get together in Ketchikan.

Halli Kenoyer calls the moves at a recent square dance. Fiddle player Brian Curtis is in the background.

The Free Radicals plays old-time dance tunes, and a live caller tells everyone how to move.

Well, the caller tries to tell them what to do; they don’t always listen. It’s square dancing, Ketchikan style.

Most of the time, the caller is longtime resident, artist and art teacher Halli Kenoyer, although she’s happy to share the spotlight if anyone wants to fill in.

She walks the dancers through each dance before the music begins.

The monthly dance isn’t just square dancing. There are circle dances and the occasional waltz. And the night just isn’t complete until the Virginia Reel.

Kenoyer tried to explain the appeal of old-time square dancing. She said it’s a community effort, and it brings out the child in everyone who comes out to play.

“I go home and my mouth is sore. What can I say? I guess maybe I’m not smiling enough the rest of the week?” she said.

You can check the Alaska Square Dance page on Facebook for upcoming dances.

The Free Radicals.

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