Local News

Area nonprofits win United Way grants

Two Ketchikan nonprofits are recipients of grants from United Way of Southeast Alaska this year.

Women in Safe Homes received $1,000 for its family reunification and preservation program, while Ketchikan Youth Initiatives snagged $1,000 for its Hungry for Health program.

The family reunification and preservation program helps provide resources for children and parents who have been separated. When children have been removed from their homes by Children’s Services, WISH helps the parents create a home environment suitable for the kids to return. That assistance could come in the form of transportation to supervised visitations, housing or employment assistance and medical care. The preservation portion of the program aims to keep families together before separation.

KYI’s Hungry for Health is a three-part workshop designed to teach healthy eating and cooking habits, as well as ways to save money. The program, which will start sometime later this year, targets young adults between the ages of 19 and 24.

The United Way of Southeast Alaska Community Impact Grants are awarded every year to nonprofits throughout the region. Twelve organizations received money this year, totaling $16,000.

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