Local News

Sales taxes, fish hatchery on Council agenda

A seasonal sales tax approved last week by the Ketchikan City Council is up for reconsideration Thursday.

The seasonal 1-percent sales tax increase is intended to take advantage of Ketchikan’s busy summertime tourism industry. If it remains unchanged, the tax would go into effect this summer, and then would drop back in fall to the current level.

An option that some on the Council prefer is a year-round, half-percent sales-tax increase.

Also Thursday, the Council will consider a motion allowing City Manager Karl Amylon to negotiate an agreement for the Southern Southeast Regional Aquaculture Association to operate the Deer Mountain Hatchery, recently vacated by Ketchikan Indian Community.

The hatchery is located at City Park, and the facility is owned by the city. SSRAA officials have asked that the city demolish the eagle sanctuary that KIC also operated at the site. If that space were converted to more rearing ponds, SSRAA estimates it could double fish production to about half a million.

SSRAA also plans to rear only king salmon, rather than king and coho; and provide educational opportunities for the public.

Also on Thursday’s Council agenda are motions to negotiate a hospital renovation pre-construction contract with Layton and Dawson construction companies; and to approve a 1-percent cost-of-living raise for non-union city employees.

The meeting starts at 7 p.m. in City Council chambers. Public comment will be heard at the start of the meeting.

Recent News

Hearing held on minimum wage ballot prop

If passed, Proposition 3 would raise the minimum wage by $1 in 2015 and another dollar in 2016. After that, the state’s minimum wage would be adjusted to rise with inflation, but must always be at least a dollar above the national minimum wage. more

2 schools move forward with last-minute hires

Houghtaling second graders at lunch.
Last-minute increases in enrollment caused two Ketchikan elementary schools to scramble for additional classrooms. Both of the schools have new classrooms in place, and they’re moving closer to finalizing the new teacher contracts. more