Local News

Glenn Brown files for School Board

Ketchikan resident Glenn Brown is the first person to file for two open Ketchikan School Board seats.

Brown is the program director of the non-profit Ketchikan Youth Court. It’s a peer justice sentencing program for first-time juvenile offenders. He is also an attorney who practiced law in Pennsylvania for 20 years.

Brown moved with his family to Ketchikan three years ago. He says he considered running for School Board the last time there were open seats, but felt he was too new to Ketchikan.

“Now I’ve been here longer and I have a better feel for the town,” he said. “And certainly with being involved in a youth industry, I have some insights into the school district and how we might be able to serve better.”

Brown says he served on the Upper Moreland School Board in Pennsylvania.

“I enjoyed the work,” he said. “It felt meaningful.”

The Ketchikan School Board and Borough Assembly have a tense relationship that school board members have brought up often in recent meetings and work sessions. Brown says he hopes to “bring more general respect” to that relationship.

Brown has five children. One of them attends Shoenbar Middle School.

The two open School Board seats are currently held by Michelle O’Brien and Misty Archibald. Neither has filed for re-election. The deadline for candidates to file for local office is Monday, Aug. 25 at 5 p.m.

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