Author Archives: Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News

Tying up ferries costs nearly half a million dollars

The ferry Taku sails into Juneau’s Auke Bay terminal. It’s tied up for the year, affecting seafood processors who transport their fish via Prince Rupert, British Columbia. (Photo by LCGS Russ/Wikimedia Commons)The Alaska Marine Highway System is paying more than $1,200 a day for long-term storage of two unused ferries. One critic says it would be better to sell them than to tie them up.

Transboundary mine agreement signed

Eight transboundary watersheds feed Southeast Alaska rivers. A new agreement with British Columbia aims to protect them from mining pollution. Critics say it doesn't do the job. (Map by Alaska Department of Natural Resources.)Alaska and British Columbia officials signed a statement of cooperation Thursday aimed at protecting rivers that flow through the province and the state.

Brotherhood, Sisterhood prepare for convention

Alaska Native Sisterhood members march in Wrangell during the Grand Camp's 2015 Convention in Wrangell. (Photo courtesy Peter Naoroz/ANB)Alaska’s oldest Native organizations are trying to attract younger members. That and other issues are on the table at the ANB-ANS Grand Camp Convention Oct. 5-8.

Pioneer homes won’t take new residents, at least for now

The Ketchikan Pioneer Home is one of six in Alaska caring for older residents. (Photo by KRBD)Alaska’s Pioneer Homes have stopped accepting new residents, at least for a while. It’s one more impact of state budget cuts.

Winter ferry schedule better than last year

The ferry Taku docks at the Sitka terminal on a snowy morning Jan. 22, 2012. Budget cuts have sidelined the ship. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)This winter’s Alaska Marine Highway schedule offers more sailings than the previous season’s. It also eliminates five-week service gaps for some communities.

State Department to hear BC mine concerns

Sulphurets Creek, which drains naturally occurring rusty water from the KSM mine prospect, enters Mitchell Creek upstream from Southeast Alaska. Tribal officials worry mining will send polluted water into British Columbia rivers that flow into Alaska. KSM officials say their pollution-control designs will keep that from happening. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)U.S. State Department officials are in Southeast Alaska this week to talk about transboundary mines. The Environmental Protection Agency has also sent representatives.

Cruise industry grows, global share shrinks

Three cruise ships dock in downtown Juneau July 14, at the height of the tourist season (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Alaska’s cruise industry is on track to hit the magic million-passenger mark this year. But it's attracting a smaller percentage of the worldwide market.

New Sealaska board member targets change

Sealaska Plaza is the location of the regional Native corporation's Juneau headquarters.  Shareholders are casting ballots to fill five board of directors seats.  (File photo/KTOO)Sealaska’s newest board member will continue to push for election and management changes. At least one long-time board member says she's willing to listen.

Road to open up more of Gravina to logging

The dotted line shows the route for the logging road to be built to Vallenar Bay.The Alaska Division of Forestry has awarded a contract to connect an existing road in the Vallenar Bay area to the rest of the island’s road system. Petersburg’s Rock-N-Road Construction won the $3.5 million contract.

Dock repair starting, tourist traffic changes

A cruise-ship lightering boat passes a salvage tugboat docked at Ketchikan's Berth 3, which was extensively damaged by the cruise ship Infinity on Friday. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)The city of Ketchikan has hired Turnagain Marine Construction to repair Ketchikan’s Berth 3. Work should be complete by July 5, possibly earlier.