Author Archives: Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News

Southeast’s largest lumber mill may close

The Viking Lumber Mill on Prince of Wales Island was awarded a contract to log part of the Big Thorne timber sale. (Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News)Owners of Southeast Alaska’s largest remaining lumber mill say it could close next year. It’s part of an ongoing battle over logging in the Tongass National Forest.

Court: Tongass Roadless Rule remains in place

A Tongass National Forest clearcut is shown in this 2014 aerial view. A new court decision limits logging on roadless areas of the forest. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)The U.S. Supreme Court will not take up a case that could have expanded logging in Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. It’s the final step in one legal battle involving what’s called the Roadless Rule.

Report: Ferries boost Anchorage, Mat-Su economies too

Cars and trucks line up to board the ferry Chenega in Sitka on Sept. 13, 2015. The ferry system carries traffic that ends up in Anchorage and Fairbanks, a new study says. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Anchorage is tied for first as the prime destination for ferrying summer tourists, according to a new report by the McDowell Group.

Will the ferry system face deeper cuts?

Passengers enjoy the scenery during a Sept. 3, 2015, fast ferry Chenega sailing between Sitka and Juneau. Sitka would lose most of its ferry service under a schedule based on a reduced budget proposed by Gov. Bill Walker. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Budget cuts have already dramatically reduced marine highway sailings. The governor's budget will make it worse. And the Legislature is likely to make further cuts.

Alaska, B.C. ink transboundary agreement

Bill Bennett, Bill Walker, British Columbia mines, Byron Mallott, Christy Clark, Schoenfeld, transboundaryAlaska and British Columbia signed a memorandum of understanding Wednesday expected to increase the state’s role in transboundary mine decisions.

Tulsequah cleanup won’t restart water treatment

Acid drainage from the Tulsequah Chief Mine discolors a leaking containment pond next to the Tulsequah River in British Columbia in 2013. (Photo courtesy Chris Miller/Trout Unlimited)Canadian regulators say the Tulsequah Chief Project, near Juneau, has agreed to reduce pollution leaking into a nearby river. But the mine won’t have to restart a shuttered water-treatment plant.

British Columbia goes after leaking mine

Acid drainage from the Tulsequah Chief Mine discolors a leaking containment pond next to the Tulsequah River in British Columbia in 2013. (Photo courtesy Chris Miller/Trout Unlimited)British Columbia is telling owners of a leaky mine in the Taku River watershed that it’s time to stop polluting the river, which flows into Alaska.

SEACC executive director resigns for health reasons

Outgoing SEACC Executive Director Malena Marvin poses while kayaking in Juneau's Mendenhall Lake. (Photo courtesy SEACC)The Southeast Alaska Conservation Council is advertising for a new executive director. Malena Marvin is resigning after leading the group for about two years.

Sealaska dividends funded by other corporations

Sealaska Plaza is the location of the regional Native corporation's Juneau headquarters.  Shareholders are casting ballots to fill five board of directors seats.  (File photo/KTOO)Sealaska will distribute $17.5 million in dividends to its 22,000 shareholders Dec. 3. Most of the money comes from sister corporations' resource earnings.

Drilling for gold: Inside the KSM’s exploration project

A drilling-crew member poses during a break at Seabridge Gold's KSM Mine. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)We've heard the arguments for and against British Columbia’s Kerr-Sulphurets-Mitchell mining project. But what happens there? Here's a look at its exploration efforts.