A cruise-ship lightering boat passes a salvage tugboat docked at Ketchikan's Berth 3, which was extensively damaged by the cruise ship Infinity on Friday. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

An orange cruise-ship lightering boat passes a salvage tugboat docked at Ketchikan’s Berth 3, which was extensively damaged by the cruise ship Infinity on Friday. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

The cruise ship Infinity is back cruising in Alaska after slamming into a Ketchikan dock last week. Meanwhile, repairs to the damaged dock could begin this week.

Last Friday afternoon, tour vendor Robert Knox was working a walkway near Ketchikan’s Berth 3. He took a video of the Infinity’s approach to, and impact with, the floating dock and supporting dolphins. It attracted nearly 30,000 views on Facebook.

On Monday, he was back on the walkway, for Alaska Amphibious Tours, aka The Ketchikan Duck Tour.

Below on the water, orange lightering boats discharged tourists from an anchored-up ship that would have otherwise been tied up at the now-broken berth.

Knox says that means tourists now come in waves, which sometimes clog up the dock.

“People who’ve prebooked on the ships, when they get off to meet with their tour coordinators, there’s a big cluster of guests. So it certainly impedes the flow of traffic,” he said.

He said he’d noticed an impact on tour sales, but couldn’t detail its extent.

A cruise-ship lightering boat pulls up to a dock near Berth 3. Ships forced to anchor in  Tongass Narrows use such boats to bring passengers to shore.  (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

A cruise-ship lightering boat pulls up to a dock near Berth 3. Ships forced to anchor in Tongass Narrows use such boats to bring passengers to shore. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

Lightering will continue for some ships until the dock and dolphins are repaired.

Damage is estimated in the millions and repairs are expected to take at least a month.

And engineer worked with harbor officials over the weekend to determine what needed to be done. Details are expected to be made public Tuesday.

The Infinity sustained scrapes, scratches and a puncture, all above the waterline. The Coast Guard allowed it to leave Ketchikan on Friday night.

In a press release, corporate spokesman Owen Torres said repairs were completed in time for the ship to leave its home port of Vancouver, British Columbia, on Sunday.

It’s sailing to Hoonah, the Hubbard Glacier near Yakutat and Juneau before returning to Ketchikan on Friday.

Torres blamed the crash on, quote, “inclement weather.” Friday was a gusty day, with winds exceeding 40 miles per hour.

The Coast Guard is investigating the incident and has not released its determination of the cause.